Video 14 Apr 14 notes

Entire family is working on garden boxes. Doing six 4’x4’ and on one 10’x2’ (for three sisters planting). Using up the scrap off the rafters from last years addition. The extended feet are just help anchor them down. I am lining the wood because it is untreated pine. The last one I built lasted 10 years and was still not rotten. I just took it out to help sell my house. Also putting down chicken wire to keep the critter from borrowing up into them. I will post more pics later but having so much fun building them thought I would post some now. Again more practical then pretty. (I have 5 done so far)

Video 13 Apr 6 notes

Got out for a walk today with the kids. It’s great to see trout lilies both my kids and I love then. We eat the entire plant after we clean them. The leaf has a sweet and somewhat peppery flavor. I usually eat no more then a cup or 2 added to a salad, or the peppery flavor gets over powering. The root is like a mini cucumber and is great. (It is so prolific here you really can pic what you want without worrying about hurting the population.)

This is also a great time to spot ramps for harvesting down the road. This year I transplanted some to my new property. I have transplanted it before. I usually surround them with a few sticks so I can find them if things get over grown. If you translate plant be sure you do not bring Galicia Mustard or any other invasive species with you.

Happy Hunting :)

Video 7 Apr 9 notes

Grabbed 4 of the junked pump palettes from work to make a compost bin. It will be a 3 bin system. I have to wait for more pumps to come in to get enough palettes to build the rest. Not terribly pretty, but functional and and free aside from the wire and fasteners.

Video 31 Mar 7 notes

So I moved in last year an noticed there were grapes growing in with this large bush. As soon as I had time I cut out the bush. The grapes were on an old wire frame and they had already started so I just let them go. Plus I had to finish building my addition so I had no time. Even at that I got enough small grapes from it to make some Jam. This year I am resetting the wires and cutting back the old canes. The new canes look really healthy. I will make it pretty next year, but for now I just hope to get it producing decent fruit again. Yes that is snow in the picture, and yes it is March 31st. Got to love Erie…

Video 23 Mar 10 notes

It was frozen and snowing this morning, but my birthday. so I went fishing. Had over a dozen hookups on egg patterns and a pheasant tail nymph. I actual use only those 2 flies for almost all of steelhead season and usually do real well. Most of the fish looked nice and had god color, but some of them were pretty beat up from spawning. All and all it was a good trip. I kept 2 for the smoker and help a guy get a monster up on to the bank. You could not use a net because it freezes after the first time it gets wet. My boots and line froze up too, and hands. I could use some spring….

Photo 21 Mar 43 notes theforagedmeal:

FORAGING ONTARIO: SPRUCE/PINE/FIR TIPS
Like dandelions we walk by the coniferous tips all the time without knowing their culinary uses. When just emerged and harvested, these tips are tender and fresh tasting with a hint of resin and citrus. Be sure to rid yourself of the papery casing or of any hard stems before using them.  Careful when harvesting late because the flavour may be too intense. Our favourite way to enjoy these is to pickle them!
click title head below for link to recipe webpage.
PICKLED SPRUCE TIPS
Makes 2 half pint jars, scale as needed
Ingredients
2 cups fresh, young spruce tips, papery husk removed
1 cup water
1/2 cup applecider vinegar
1 tsp salt
1/4 cup sugar
Method
Pack your 1/2 pint canning jars with spruce tips, stopping 1/2 inch below the lid
Heat the water, vinegar, salt and sugar until boiling
Pour the boiling pickle liquid over the jars of spruce tips, filling them almost all the way to the top of the jar, making sure to use a paper clip, UCT, or some other thin utensil to agitate the tips and release air bubbles if needed.
Now place the canning lids on the jars of spruce tips and turn the jars upside down. Leave overnight to seal. In the morning you will find they have formed a natural hermetic seal  due to the heat of the boiling water. Filling the jars more full of liquid than usual also helps the seal to form, as without the pressure of boiling water outside of the jars, there is no danger of them exploding due to overfilling.
This is a back alley canning procedure I covered in the fiddlehead pickle post. If you prefer to can yours in a water bath, thats just fine. The low ph***in this recipe and the amount of sugar and salt is more than enough to ensure a bacteria-less environment though.

I have never tried this, looks cool

theforagedmeal:

FORAGING ONTARIO: SPRUCE/PINE/FIR TIPS

Like dandelions we walk by the coniferous tips all the time without knowing their culinary uses. When just emerged and harvested, these tips are tender and fresh tasting with a hint of resin and citrus. Be sure to rid yourself of the papery casing or of any hard stems before using them.  Careful when harvesting late because the flavour may be too intense. Our favourite way to enjoy these is to pickle them!

click title head below for link to recipe webpage.

PICKLED SPRUCE TIPS

Makes 2 half pint jars, scale as needed

Ingredients

  • 2 cups fresh, young spruce tips, papery husk removed
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup applecider vinegar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/4 cup sugar

Method

  1. Pack your 1/2 pint canning jars with spruce tips, stopping 1/2 inch below the lid
  2. Heat the water, vinegar, salt and sugar until boiling
  3. Pour the boiling pickle liquid over the jars of spruce tips, filling them almost all the way to the top of the jar, making sure to use a paper clip, UCT, or some other thin utensil to agitate the tips and release air bubbles if needed.
  4. Now place the canning lids on the jars of spruce tips and turn the jars upside down. Leave overnight to seal. In the morning you will find they have formed a natural hermetic seal  due to the heat of the boiling water. Filling the jars more full of liquid than usual also helps the seal to form, as without the pressure of boiling water outside of the jars, there is no danger of them exploding due to overfilling.

This is a back alley canning procedure I covered in the fiddlehead pickle post. If you prefer to can yours in a water bath, thats just fine. The low ph***in this recipe and the amount of sugar and salt is more than enough to ensure a bacteria-less environment though.

I have never tried this, looks cool

Video 20 Mar 8 notes

Hit Elk Creek, more for a walk then anything else. Got hooked up on 4 decent steelheads but the stream was too fast for me to get them in. Hooked up and got one in, in the riffles but it was foul hooked. No great pictures but fun walk… Still too cold for mushrooms. It snowed today.

Video 16 Mar 55 notes

Went down the road to Hurry Hill Maple Farm for their free tour and some maple hot chocolate. They had trees taped but no flow( it is like 19 Deg today). They had a really cool tour of the sugar shack though and a bunch of exhibits on the history of maple syrup making. Fun day. I bought maple syrup, Maple candy, Maple cotton candy, Maple covered Nuts and sampled a ton of other maple products. Also I found another source for local raw honey, and really good local raw milk based cheeses. Both the farms are just a couple miles away.

Video 14 Mar 10 notes

erieforage:

Drawing/modeling up plans for the mobile chicken coop. I want it to look kind of like a gypsy wagon. I still need to decide if it will be light enough to use only one set of wheels. This is my concept drawing and some quick renders. I will post the pictures of the build and the completed coop. I plan to start on it in a week or so.

Drawn in Autocad renders were done in Navisworks

Video 10 Mar 108 notes

Splitting wood… So list this under incredibly helpfully advice. That no one bothers to mention. I about wore out my back splitting wood till someone told me to use an old tire. It’s not picturesque, but it keep the wood upright till you are done splitting it.

Video 9 Mar 10 notes

Drawing/modeling up plans for the mobile chicken coop. I want it to look kind of like a gypsy wagon. I still need to decide if it will be light enough to use only one set of wheels. This is my concept drawing and some quick renders. I will post the pictures of the build and the completed coop. I plan to start on it in a week or so.

Video 9 Mar 21 notes

hqcreations:

erieforage:

Poultry of the woods 😋

do they really taste like chicken?

Somewhat, but really it tastes like a mushroom. :)

Photo 27 Feb 15 notes erieforage:

My daughter and I tried it out. A 1/4” sliver off the mushroom she has in the picture lasted about 1 mile or 15 min, so 3 mushrooms will move a spark for about a day; however it catches a spark so easily, I would just star new at each camp sight. It does not work if the mushroom is wet or too moist, dead black rotting ones work best. It also would be a great hand warmer on winter.

It’s freezing again so I did an experiment. First, I lit a dried out mushroom with flint and steel. It literally took the first spark that hit it. Second, I used a small mushroom about 2 inches as a hand warmer. It was amazing. I will do it again and take some pictures, but it lasted about 2 hours and I could put it down in the snow do some work and com back to it without a problem.

erieforage:

My daughter and I tried it out. A 1/4” sliver off the mushroom she has in the picture lasted about 1 mile or 15 min, so 3 mushrooms will move a spark for about a day; however it catches a spark so easily, I would just star new at each camp sight. It does not work if the mushroom is wet or too moist, dead black rotting ones work best. It also would be a great hand warmer on winter.

It’s freezing again so I did an experiment. First, I lit a dried out mushroom with flint and steel. It literally took the first spark that hit it. Second, I used a small mushroom about 2 inches as a hand warmer. It was amazing. I will do it again and take some pictures, but it lasted about 2 hours and I could put it down in the snow do some work and com back to it without a problem.

Video 22 Feb 28 notes

hqcreations:

erieforage:

Winter notes:
I just had to post this. My wife dyed some wool with tropical punch Kool aid, and is making some socks.

Seriously, Kool Aid? What kind of mordant did she use? And I adore that pattern! Mum made me a scarf with that pattern!

It already has citric acid in it, but she added white vinegar. She has great recipes for the patterns.

Video 19 Feb 66 notes

hqcreations:

erieforage:

Winter notes:
I moved into my new house late in the season, and had no time to bring in wood. I decided to try compressed wood bricks. They have really worked well. They burn slower then lumber and leave almost no ash. They light easy and fast. I figure a ton of bricks equates to about 1 3/4 cord the way we are burning. Right now I have a bout 3.5 tones out in the garage. I think that will bring me through the winter. I got it delivered at $210 a ton. I will still bring in wood if I can get it free, but I think I am going to buy at least 2 tons of bricks each winter.

Cooool. Never heard of these wood bricks before. You think they recycle scrap wood to make this? Can I ask where you got these?

Yes, Leftovers from sawmills in Ohio (EZ-bricks). Also no additives or binders, 100% pressed hardwood. If they gets wet at all they fall completely apart, but that has not been a problem. I plan to buy or make a press. I can get wood chips and sawdust free locally.


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